Review and Interview: Marshall Ryan Maresca

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The exciting debut to Marshall Ryan Maresca’s Streets of Maradaine fantasy series!


ABOUT THE BOOK

The Rynax brothers had gone legit after Asti Rynax’s service in Druth Intelligence had shattered his nerves, and marriage and fatherhood convinced Verci Rynax to leave his life of thievery. They settled back in their old neighborhood in West Maradaine and bought themselves a shop, eager for a simple, honest life.

Then the Holver Alley Fire incinerated their plans. With no home, no shop, and no honest income—and saddled with a looming debt—they fall back on their old skills and old friends.

With a crew of other fire victims, Asti and Verci plan a simple carriage heist, but the job spirals out of control as they learn that the fire was no accident. Lives in Holver Alley were destroyed out of a sadistic scheme to buy the land.

Smoldering for revenge, burdened with Asti’s crumbling sanity, the brothers and their crew of amateurs and washouts swear to take down those responsible for the fire, no matter the cost.


ENCHANTED REVIEW

The Holver Alley Crew is the first in a new series set in his existing Maradaine world, and it’s a great start to a new series!

Having read some of the others in this world, reading this one is like visiting a familiar place but going somewhere new. The world-building is one of my favorite aspects of Maresca’s work (as evidenced in some of my interview questions below!) and The Holver Alley Crew does not disappoint. We get to see a different side of the world in Holver Alley, the not-so-nice-don’t-buy-a-suburban-ranch-in-this-part-of-town kind of side.

The Rynax brothers, Asti and Verci, couldn’t lead more different lives if they tried, and when their futures area irrevocably altered by a fire, they have tough decisions to make. In the spirit of not spoiling the book, I will say that they plan a simple heist, but their plan takes a very different turn as they learn that the truth about the Holver Alley fire.

I highly recommend The Holver Alley Crew and give it my highest rating: five lanterns!

5 Lamps


AUTHOR INTERVIEW

Enchanted Alley: Welcome to the Alley! We’re certainly glad you’re here.

I’ll start off with an easy question. If you had to choose one book or series to read over and over for a lifetime, what would it be and why?

Marshall Ryan Maresca: You mean, other than the combined Maradaine books?  Because that would be the obvious answer.

Real answer: Watership Down by Richard Adams.  I’ve read it many, many times, and I keep coming back to it.  It’s deep, rich fantasy filled with mythology, adventure, a heist and a war.  But with rabbits.  And it’s amazing.

EA: That is a great book and author. Good choice! Speaking of great books and great writers, what are your “must have” tools for writing? Can you give us a glimpse into your process?

MRM: In terms of tools: I need my laptop with Scrivener on it, and a good set of headphones that let me tune out the world.  Add in coffee in the morning or rooibos tea in the evening, and that’s the core of “what I need”.

Now, if I have space to sit, lay out my notebooks and outline materials, all the better.  But if I have my laptop and headphones, I can work just about anywhere.

EA: If you could live in the world of The Hover Alley Crew, what your life be like?

MRM: So, if I lived in Maradaine, I probably wouldn’t live in North Seleth, the neighborhood where Holver Alley Crew takes place.

Ideally, I would live on the other side of the river in neighborhoods like High River or Fenton, which have their share of artist communities, coffee shop and wine clubs, and is near one the fancier institute of higher learning.  A perfect place to write, engage in the arts and talk philosophy into the late hours while drinking coffee or wine.

But North Seleth wouldn’t be terrible: it might be a poor neighborhood, but it’s a community where people know each other and take care of one another.  There certainly are worse places in the city to end up.

EA: High River and Fenton are my kinds of towns. That’s one of the best things about books, getting to visit places you wouldn’t otherwise!  Up next, how long does it take to plot and write a novel? Which part of the process is your favorite? Least favorite?

MRM: It varies, but the plotting/outlining process is usually about a month, and then the writing process from five-to-eight months, depending on what else is going on.  Of course, since I have many projects going forward, at any given time I have different things in different stages.  But my favorite part is definitely that end-stage of drafting, where all the elements have come together, and it’s mostly a process of letting it race out of your fingers into the keyboard.  Worst part?  That middle phase, where even though I know what needs to happen (because: outline), it still feels like pulling teeth.

EA: I’ve heard the middle is a least favorite part for lots of writers! Okay, so which character is your favorite to write?

MRM: Oh, this is one of those “which child do you love most?” questions.  But OK, I’ll pick.  In all the Maradaine books, it’s probably Corrie from the Constabulary books.  She’s an absolute hoot.  If I narrow to just the Holver Alley Crew, then I’ll go with Helene.  Actually, Corrie and Helene would probably get along pretty well, if they weren’t on opposite sides of the law.  That could be a fun pairing….

Yes, that would be fun! I’d love to read that (hint, hint…)

Thank you so much for coming to hang out with us at The Enchanted Alley. We love your work around here and can’t wait to have you back again. 


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Marshall Ryan Maresca grew up in upstate New York and studied film and video production at Penn State.  He now lives Austin with his wife and son.  His work appeared in Norton Anthology of Hint Fiction and Rick Klaw’s anthology Rayguns Over TexasHe also has had several short plays produced and has worked as a stage actor, a theatrical director and an amateur chef. His novels The Thorn of Dentonhill and A Murder of Mages each begin their own fantasy series, both set in the port city of Maradaine. For more information, visit Marshall’s website at http://www.mrmaresca.com.


Essential Information

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Title: THE HOLVER ALLEY CREW

Author: Marshall Ryan Maresca

Series: Streets of Maradaine #1

ISBN: 9780756412609

Release Date: March 7, 2017

Publisher: DAW MASS MARKET

List Price: $7.99

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Blog Tour: David B. Coe, The Outlanders

The Enchanted Alley would like to welcome David B. Coe!

David is here today as a stop on his blog tour for the newly re-released edition of The Outlanders! He’ll be talking to us about the things he’s learned since The Outlanders was originally released — things about writing, about publishing, and about the facing the challenge of returning to your earlier works once you’ve learned a few things. 

About THE OUTLANDERS!

Four years after the insidious, devastating invasion by agents of Lon-Ser, Tobyn-Ser’s Order of Mages and Masters is riven by conflict and paralyzed by inaction. From the outlander, Baram, they have learned much about their neighbor to the west: Unlike Tobyn-Ser, which is served by the Mage-Craft of the Children of Amarid, Lon-Ser is devoid of magic. Instead it possesses a dazzling and deadly technology that shapes every aspect of its people’s daily life.
Frustrated by the Order’s inability to act, Orris, a young, rebellious mage, takes it upon himself to prevent further attacks on his homeland. Taking Baram from his prison, he embarks upon a perilous journey to Bragor-Nal, an enormous, violent city in Lon-Ser, ruled by a brutal, feudal-like system of Break-Laws, Nal-Lords, and Overlords. As Orris soon learns, however, Baram has been driven insane by his captivity. Upon reaching his strange and fractured homeland, the man abandons Orris.
Armed only with his magic, Orris is thrust into a world whose language he does not comprehend and whose technology he can barely fathom. Together with Gwilym, a man with strange powers, whose vision of Orris has lured him out of the mountains and into the chaos of the Nals, and Melyor, a beautiful Nal-Lord who harbors a secret that could cost her life, Orris must end the threat to Tobyn-Ser without getting himself and his companions killed.
THE OUTLANDERS is the second volume of the LonTobyn Chronicle, David B. Coe’s Crawford Award-winning debut series. This is the Author’s Edit of the original book.

And without further ado, here’s David! 

“Lessons Learned in the Writing Trade”

by David B. Coe

I have recently released the Author’s Edit of The Outlanders, the second novel in my very first series, the LonTobyn Chronicle. This follows the re-release of Children of Amarid, book I in the series. Book III, Eagle-Sage, should be re-released in December. These books are incredibly special to me. They launched my career, won me the Crawford Fantasy Award as best new author (this was back when novels were still published on granite tablets), and established my career critically and commercially.

But I also recognized from the time I wrote the books originally that they suffered from many of the flaws that afflict first novels. They were earnest, ambitious, and in many ways quite good, but they were also wordy, overwritten, and longer than they needed to be. Hence the Author’s Edit of the new versions. The Author’s Edit is kind of like the Director’s Cut of a movie — I have revised the books to make them more readable without, I hope, compromising them in any way when it comes to essential story elements like plot, setting, character, pacing, etc. I was able to do this now because at this stage in my career, after writing nineteen novels over as many years, I’ve learned a thing or two about writing and storytelling.

So, I thought it might be helpful to look at some of what I’ve learned and at a few of the lessons I was able to apply when I edited these beloved but imperfect early novels.

  1. Less is more — One of the things I did in editing these books was remove exposition, adverbs, and unnecessary dialog tags including gestures and facial expressions. Not all of them, but enough that the new version of The Outlanders is some 14,000 words shorter than the original. Children of Amarid I cut by 20,000 words. Why? Because readers don’t need to be told every little thing. For instance, sometimes — most times if we’re doing it correctly — dialog conveys meaning through wording and context. We can usually tell from what a character says whether she is angry or sad or joyful. In the original versions I put in so many expressions and gestures that my characters read as caricatures, their facial expressions changing with every word until they seemed like something out of a Bugs Bunny cartoon. “Less is more” means what it sounds like. I could get away with describing fewer of those expressions and gestures without losing meaning. The result is a cleaner, leaner manuscript.
  1. Trust your reader — This is something my editor told me a lot while working on those early books. Readers don’t need to have every little storytelling nuance explained to them. In fact, as with “Less is more,” if we do our jobs as authors we shouldn’t have to explain much at all. Readers can figure out from dialog, from action, from the little details we show, from limited internal monologue, all that they need to follow our stories. We need to trust their ability to intuit what they need to know. Overtelling, pointing out the already obvious, undermines our writing. In a sense, “Trust your reader” is another way of saying “Trust yourself.” Err on the side of telling too little. Let your story speak for itself. And if your Beta readers or your editors don’t understand something, they’ll let you know and you can bolster the narrative with a bit more exposition.
  1. Don’t overuse adverbs — Some people will say that we should NEVER use adverbs. That’s ridiculous. Sometimes adverbs add to our readers’ understanding of context, scene, and emotion. The danger lies in overuse of adverbs. The problem with adverbs is that when used too often they become of symptom of showing rather telling. I used way too many in the original versions of these books and I removed a lot of them in the edits. Some remain, and they add to the narrative. You don’t need to ban them from your writing entirely (see what I did there?); just beware of them.
  1. Reach high, push yourself — This is actually a lesson I was reminded of in reading through these old books, a lesson from my younger self to my older self. They were ambitious novels that demanded a lot of me when I wrote them. I sometimes wonder if my more recent books have been too “safe” in a way, and I am currently writing a new epic fantasy that is as sprawling and far-reaching as these early efforts. And I’m having a blast. So if you sense something lacking in your current work-in-progress, maybe you need to push yourself a bit harder. You might be surprised by how much fun you’ll have if you do.

Lessons learned. Every writing project teaches me something new, whether I’m editing or writing. I love that about this craft. It keeps my work fresh, and it keeps me feeling challenged. As long as that continues to be the case, I’ll keep writing.

Thank you, David!

Everyone here at the Enchanted Alley hopes you will be writing for a very long time. 


About the Author

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David B. Coe/D.B. Jackson is the award-winning author of nineteen fantasy novels. As David B. Coe, he writes The Case Files of Justis Fearsson, a contemporary urban fantasy from Baen Books. The first two books, Spell Blind and His Father’s Eyes came out in 2015. The third volume, Shadow’s Blade, has recently been released. Under the name D.B. Jackson, he writes the Thieftaker Chronicles, a historical urban fantasy from Tor Books that includes Thieftaker, Thieves’ Quarry, A Plunder of Souls, and Dead Man’s Reach.

David is also the author of the Crawford Award-winning LonTobyn Chronicle, which he is in the process of reissuing, as well was the critically acclaimed Winds of the Forelands quintet and Blood of the Southlands trilogy. He wrote the novelization of Ridley Scott’s movie, Robin Hood. David’s books have been translated into a dozen languages.

He lives on the Cumberland Plateau with his wife and two daughters. They’re all smarter and prettier than he is, but they keep him around because he makes a mean vegetarian fajita. When he’s not writing he likes to hike, play guitar, and stalk the perfect image with his camera.


Where to find David online


Essential Information

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Title: THE OUTLANDERS (The LonTobyn Chronicle, Book 2)

Author: David B. Coe

Publisher: Lore Seekers Press

Price: $4.99 eBook/ $18.95 Paperback

Length: 561  pages

ReleaseDate: October 2, 2016

ASIN: B01M0ZQPZ9

Goodreads link

Purchase links
Amazon
Barnes & Noble
Books-A-Million


Let’s Talk Promotions is also sponsoring a tour-wide giveaway. Click below for more information and to enter. 

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Guest Post: Jim McDonald

The Enchanted Alley would like to welcome today’s guest, Jim McDonald! 


About Jim McDonald

Jim has spent over 25 years as a business and technology consultant, which has allowed him to travel around much of the world.  Now somewhat settled down in the Carolinas, he is using a lifelong interest in history, mythology, anthropology, the hard sciences and B movies to bring his own versions of folklore to life.

When not clacking away at a laptop either for the job that pays the bills or drawing the odd ideas from his head to paper to disturb and amuse the readers, he can be found playing with hot glass or running around in a kilt promoting Celtic culture with his wife and three dogs pretending not to know him.


Today Jim is talking about what it’s like to be a writer, constantly being judged, and how to handle that fear and criticism. 

Fear in a Sea of Judgement

Has your finger ever hovered over the button, poised to send your manuscript off to your beat readers? Your editor? Your publisher?

The one that shoves it out into the world on Kindle?

When your heart races, the sheen of sweat on your brow, dampness in your palms that sends you to make another cup of coffee instead of sharing your work?

Do you have thoughts about the controversial scene? The one that kept you up at nights, or that you wrote around for weeks, knowing you’d have to come back to it at some point?

That statement you know will bring down scorn from some people?

Just even the simple internal doubt about whether or not your work is good enough to warrant a form rejection letter from the slush pile?

You know, that old friend. Fear.

As a writer, you pour your heart and soul into words streaming on the page. Your thoughts stretch to wondering what people will think of you, because of what you have written. What will you do if people don’t like it? Even worse, what if a lot of people read it, and you stir up a lot of noise because of the subject?

Good.

There’s an old saying. Kill your darlings. I carry it a little further. Give life to your dreams and fears.

If your writing is truly worthwhile, it is not only entertaining, but will energize some, and infuriate others. Trying to make everyone happy leaves no one satisfied.

The key to having your message heard, is giving people something worth remembering. And almost always, this comes from triggering one or more of our four core emotions. Happiness, Sadness, Fear or Anger.

When I look at the books that hold the most meaning for me, they are the ones that pushed the limits for their time. Robert Heinlein is one of my favorite authors, and he was more than able of stirring up people of every ilk, and pushing buttons. Some people saw Stranger in a Strange Land as the foundation for the Free Love movement of the 60’s. Others saw Starship Troopers as both an endorsement and an indictment of the military industrial complex. Both are stories that spurred controversy, satires of their subject matter and the societies he modeled.

Not so far on my end of preferred reading has been the 50 Shades of Grey phenomenon from E. L. James. Definitely controversial, sending some people into frenzies that it promotes and glamorizes abuse. For others, it’s been freeing to give a tantalizing glimpse into a niche lifestyle.

What do these have in common? They are controversial, and influential in society. I have to think that when Robert H. was writing freely about incest, it gave him a little pause. E. L. James has certainly taken some backlash, as well as praise.

Writing gives us a medium to explore those ideas that fascinate, titillate, and terrify us. And then we get to share that with our readers, and do the same for them.

So why do we hold ourselves back, and ultimately fail our readers?

We are afraid what people will think. We worry about how others will judge us.

And guess what?

They are going to do it anyway.

I’ve been guilty of toning down some of my writing. It’s often been my regret about some of my work. I worried about how people would view me based on something from a story, and I’d cut it, or at least trim it back. When I talk to my readers afterwards, and they talk about how they read something, or how it affected them, I’ve realized how much of a punch I’ve pulled in a few cases.

I’ve gotten better about this, and the reactions I get these days are much more visceral. On a couple of earlier works when I’ve new editions to fix the little things, I’ve taken opportunities to make small enhancements to restore some of that impact. But at some point, you’ve got to push your children out into the world, warts and all.

So I hereby challenge myself to push more boundaries, especially the ones that make me uncomfortable. The ones that make me grow. And hopefully, touch at least one reader out there.

I’d rather be judged for pushing some limit, testing some boundary, shoving someone’s darling off a cliff with a hand grenade attached than being judged for doing something without substance or meaning. And no, I’m not looking to make everyone happy. Really, I’m not looking to make anyone happy. Except myself.

Even if I worry how my work will be received, I’d rather people look at me and shake their head because of what I do, not because of what I might have done.

Will you do the same?

Want more of this? Come by and see me at http://www.jim-mcdonald.net/. And soon will be launching a podcast over at: http://www.thewritermind.com/.

Thank you, Jim!

We’re really looking forward to seeing you push those boundaries and see where you go from here! 


Jim can be found all along the interwebs at the following places:

Be sure to show Jim’s latests releases some love as well! 


51rxx8jz1xlWe Are Not This 

Over two dozen writers from North Carolina or with deep ties to the Tarheel State band together to raise money for LGBTQ charities in Charlotte and North Carolina as a response to the NC General Assembly’s passage of HB2, the “bathroom bill.”

We are not discrimination.
We are not hate.
We are not fear.
We are not oppression.
We Are Not This.

Proceeds from the sale of this anthology will go to support LGBTQ charities and non-profits in North Carolina.


51ucbzaj9dlUnbound and Determined

Greyson Forrester, born and raised to be a powerful wizard, has survived his trial but left with bigger mysteries behind it all than before. Discovering the trial was just the first battle in a much longer war and the veils between the realms nearly impenetrable, Grey’s lost everything and is again on the run, trying to keep a tenuous hold on life and discover if his restored powers are a gift or a curse.Lost, injured, and alone, someone makes the offer he can’t refuse. To save the two women he loves, and amend for the trail of destruction in his wake, all he has to do is one little job.One thing is certain.The ferryman’s price is a lot more expensive on the return trip from the land of the dead.

Guest Post: Cindy Koepp

The Enchanted Alley would like to welcome Cindy Koepp.

Please give her a very enchanted welcome!


Virtual Tour
Author: Cindy Koepp
Featured Book Releases: Remnant in the Stars and The Loudest Actions
November 7 – 21, 2017

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Without further ado… here’s Cindy! 

Any Sufficiently Advanced Technology: Mechanized Armor

In Remnant in the Stars and The Loudest Actions, the League pilots (the bad guys) used mechanized armor or “mechs” for fighter craft. These are huge (much taller than a person) robots piloted by someone who communicates mentally with the computer from inside a cockpit located in the chest. The mechs come in two varieties: the smaller and lighter Dervishes and the much sturdier and larger Samurai.

The mechs have the advantage of being able to work in space and in atmosphere. They have shielding and armor to protect them and three kinds of weapons for offense. Each mech has railguns, lasers, and missiles. The pilot selects targets and weaponry and actually flies the mech around.

This is hardly a new concept. Anime has had powered suits and piloted robots for decades. I remember watching anime as a kid and seeing some of these mechs. Some of them look more human than others. Mechs show up in role-playing games (RPGs), too. Even movies have gotten into the act with Iron Man popping up here and there.

That’s all grand fun in fiction, but do powered armor suits and mechs exist in real life?

Yes, they do, sort of.

You won’t be able to see Iron Man flying around any time soon, and the Dervishes and Samurai in the stories are still a long way off, but there are powered armor suits that can protect the wearer and improve their strength and agility in stressful situations. (http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/which-sci-fi-armor-armys-fancy-new-battle-suit-actually-180949726/?no-ist)

These powered suits are called “TALOS,” an acronym for “Tactical Assault Light Operator Suit.”  Yep, I can see why they gave it an acronym. TALOS doesn’t have all the cool stuff Iron Man has. Nor does it carry energy shields, railguns, lasers, and missiles. The person wearing the suit doesn’t have to “jack in” to the computer with a cable feeding to his brain.

Revision’s TALOS does provide protection for the wearer, increased strength, and improved situational awareness through a wearable computer that provides handy info. Not quite Tony Stark’s Jarvis, but helpful nevertheless. Revision’s TALOS is slated for release into the field in 2018

Here’s more info

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xIYHVE1We54

And, you can check it out in motion:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v9Wbj1-pZcQ

There are other versions of this. Another company, Lockheed Martin, has come up with one they’re calling HULC (Human Universal Load Carrier). This one is less about armor and more about helping people carry an excessive load under adverse conditions. The interesting thing about HULC is that it even bears its own weight so the wearer doesn’t have to.

Want to see it in motion? Here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p2W23ysgWKI

So, powered suits already exist, at least in prototype mode. Some are only slightly better than armor plus a radio, but others are helping the wearer carry loads and even gain situational awareness.

Will we see Dervish and Samurai type mechs someday? Maybe. Keep an eye on the sky as robotics moves forward.

Wow! That was cool! Thank you, Cindy! I think I’d like the HULC for carrying around my books. 🙂 

Enchanted readers, look below to find out more about Cindy’s two latests releases and to check out the rest of her blog tour stops! 


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About the Author: Originally from Michigan, Cindy Koepp has a degree in Wildlife Sciences and teaching certification in Elementary Education from rival universities. After teaching for fourteen years, she pursued a master’s degree in Adult Learning with a specialization in Training and Performance Improvement. Cindy has five published science fiction and fantasy novels, a serial published online, short stories in five anthologies, and a few self-published teacher resource books. When she isn’t reading or writing, Cindy spends time whistling with a crazy African Grey. Cindy is currently working as an optician in Iowa and as an editor with PDMI Publishing and Barking Rain Press.

 


remnantinthestarscover_1200x800Book Synopsis for Remnant in the Stars: Two hundred years ago, the Aolanian home world exploded and a remnant of survivors escaped. As their convoy combed the galaxy looking for a new world to colonize, they discovered Earth and were given permission to establish a temporary base while they continued their search for a new home world. When an Aolanian exploration vessel goes missing after transmitting a garbled distress call, the uneasy alliance between the humans and the Aolanians is put to the test as two anti-Aolanian groups jockey to use this opportunity to press their own agendas by foiling the rescue mission.

Because his daughter was onboard the Kesha when it vanished, Calonti Sora reluctantly signs on as an astrogator with the Gyrfalcon, one of the ships in the search party. There he meets up with an old human friend, Kirsten Abbott. Together, they work to overcome prejudice and political plots as they race toward an enemy no one could expect.


loudest_actions_cover_1200x933Book Synopsis for The Loudest Actions: First contact missions are hard enough, but they get even tougher when the negotiator has an ego the size of a gas giant.

Burke Zacharias, a first contact researcher, is chosen to spearhead humanity’s first official contact with Montans, an insect race that has already had a run-in with less friendly humans. Although his words and overtures toward the Montans are cordial enough, the Montans are put off by how he treats the crew of the scout ship that brought him to the world.

With other, less friendly forces trying to establish a foothold on the world, the negotiation must succeed in spite of Burke, or the Montans could be facing extinction.


Author Links

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/KoeppC

Twitter: @CCKoepp

Website: http://ckoepp.com/


Tour Schedule and Activities

Be sure to visit the other stops on the tour! They’re sure to be lots of fun! 

11/7 Beauty in Ruins Guest Post

11/7 The Seventh Star Interview

11/8 MyLifeMyBooksMyEscape Interview

11/9 Jordan Hirsch Review

11/10 Magic of Books Guest Post

11/10 3 Partners in Shopping, Nana, Mommy, & Sissy, Too! Top Ten’s List

11/11 Sheila’s Guests and Reviews Guest Post

11/11 Novel-ties Review

11/12 KylieJude.com Top-Tens List (Blogger Picks Topic)

11/13 Darkling Delights Guest Post

11/14 Enchanted Alley Guest Post

11/15 Bee’s Knees Reviews Review

11/15 The Sinister Scribblings of Sarah E. Glenn Guest Post

11/16 Jorie Loves a Story Review

11/16 The Word Nerds Guest Post

11/17 SpecMusicMuse Review

11/18 Jorie Loves a Story Q and A

11/18 Sapphyria’s Book Reviews Guest Post

11/19 Deal Sharing Aunt Interview

11/20 Jorie Loves a Story Review

11/20 D.L. Gardner Blog Guest Post

11/21 The Swill Blog Review

11/21 Willow Star Serenity Review


Purchase Links

Amazon Link for Remnant in the Stars

Kindle Version

Amazon Links for The Loudest Actions

Kindle Version